Business Report MCQs

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A Business Report is a written communication of factual information on a specific subject presented in an orderly and formal manner.
Business Report MCQs

Business Report MCQs

A Business Report is a written communication of factual information on a specific subject presented in an orderly and formal manner. Here on MCQs.club we have prepared Multiple-choice Questions (MCQs) on Business Reports that fully cover Report writing MCQs, Proposal writing MCQs, Letter writing MCQs, Letter drafting MCQs with answers. Moreover, these mcq on report writing include business letter mcqs. Our MCQs are helpful for Business management exams, Professional accountancy exams and competitive exams.

  1. Business report – A Business Report is a written communication of factual information on a specific subject presented in an orderly and formal manner.
    1. True
    2. False
  1. Examples of the objectives of business reports in large businesses might include:
    1. Presenting an analysis to management on a specific issue or incident or on the on-going state of affairs of the business.
    2. Providing evidence of regulatory compliance to regulatory authorities, shareholders, creditors, employees or some other stakeholder.
    3. Providing product or service information to stakeholders such as customers and employees.
    4. All of the above
  1. Features of a report include:
      1. It is entirely based on observation, investigation and analysis.
      2. It gives an account of some specific situation.
      3. It talks about a particular problem in detail.
      4. Reports work best for judging the performances of different departments in an organization.
      5. It is argued to be fact finding and not fault finding.
    1. All of the above
    2. (I) and (IV) only
    3. (II) (IV) and (V) only
    4. None
  1. The primary objective of a report is to provide a basis for decision and action. The secondary objective of a report which must be achieved in order that the primary objective is achieved is normally:
    1. To inform
    2. To record
    3. To recommend.
    4. All of the above
  1. The key components of a business report are:
      1. Reader
      2. Writer
      3. Objective
      4. Subject
      5. Structure
    1. All of the above
    2. (I) (III) and (IV) only
    3. (I) and (III) only
    4. None
  1. Examples of a written business report may be delivered include:
    1. Hold a meeting to discuss the issues then write a report.
    2. Send a written report then follow it up with a meeting to discuss the report.
    3. Deliver the report in the form of a presentation.
    4. All of the above
  1. Identify the Types of business reports.
    1. Voluntary reports, Internal reports, External reports
    2. Formal reports, Informal reports, Statutory reports
    3. Periodic reports, Special reports, Analytical report
    4. All of the above

  1. Voluntary reports –
    1. These are prepared on one’s own initiative without someone else’s demand. These are detailed reports with enough of discussion dedicated to the background of the subject with careful expression of the purpose.
    2. A report prepared and presented according to the form and procedure laid down by law is called a statutory report. For e.g.: Audit report.
    3. are prepared and submitted at regular, prescribed intervals. They may be submitted annually, semi-annually, quarterly, monthly, fortnightly, weekly or even daily. They are organised in a standard predefined way.
    4. It analyses the facts, draws conclusions and makes recommendations. These reports are generally organised around logical arguments and conclusions.
  1. Statutory reports –
    1. These are prepared on one’s own initiative without someone else’s demand. These are detailed reports with enough of discussion dedicated to the background of the subject with careful expression of the purpose.
    2. A report prepared and presented according to the form and procedure laid down by law is called a statutory report. For e.g.: Audit report.
    3. are prepared and submitted at regular, prescribed intervals. They may be submitted annually, semi-annually, quarterly, monthly, fortnightly, weekly or even daily. They are organised in a standard predefined way.
    4. It analyses the facts, draws conclusions and makes recommendations. These reports are generally organised around logical arguments and conclusions.
  1. Periodic reports –
    1. These are prepared on one’s own initiative without someone else’s demand. These are detailed reports with enough of discussion dedicated to the background of the subject with careful expression of the purpose.
    2. A report prepared and presented according to the form and procedure laid down by law is called a statutory report. For e.g.: Audit report.
    3. are prepared and submitted at regular, prescribed intervals. They may be submitted annually, semi-annually, quarterly, monthly, fortnightly, weekly or even daily. They are organised in a standard predefined way.
    4. It analyses the facts, draws conclusions and makes recommendations. These reports are generally organised around logical arguments and conclusions.
  1. Analytical report –
    1. These are prepared on one’s own initiative without someone else’s demand. These are detailed reports with enough of discussion dedicated to the background of the subject with careful expression of the purpose.
    2. A report prepared and presented according to the form and procedure laid down by law is called a statutory report. For e.g.: Audit report.
    3. are prepared and submitted at regular, prescribed intervals. They may be submitted annually, semi-annually, quarterly, monthly, fortnightly, weekly or even daily. They are organised in a standard predefined way.
    4. It analyses the facts, draws conclusions and makes recommendations. These reports are generally organised around logical arguments and conclusions.
  1. Writing a report is an involved process. It requires information to be collected and research performed. Data needs collating, organising and then using to argue logically and reach conclusions or recommendations.
    1. The above statement is incorrect
    2. The above statement is correct
  1. The key stages in writing a report are:
    1. Preparation, Organise the information, Plan the layout
    2. Write a first (rough) draft, Editorial, revision and writing a final draft, Checking the final draft
    3. Both A&B
    4. None
  1. Features of effective reports include:
    1. Fit for purpose, Decisive, Easy to read and follow
    2. Correct in fact and language, Concise, Persuasive
    3. Both A&B
    4. None

  1. Identify the characteristics of a bad report:
    1. Hard work, boring and irritating to read
    2. Still needs basic editing
    3. Inconcise, is muddled and illogical
    4. All of the above
  1. Methods of Generating ideas and collecting information for report writing might include:
    1. Brainstorming
    2. Sequential notes and lists
    3. Mind-mapping and patterned note-making
    4. All of the above
  1. There are many sources that can be used for researching the report. These include:
    1. Colleagues – particularly those with relevant experience
    2. Performing an audit, review or investigation, Observation
    3. The Internet, Experts and specialists, Technical journals
    4. All of the above
  1. Never assume the reader knows the links between the groups and how the information flows – your report must explain them to clearly build the full picture. The way to do this is:
    1. Construct a pyramid of thoughts where each level from the bottom upwards summarises the groups below.
    2. When you present the information to the reader (i.e. write the report) you present it in a top-downwards fashion starting with the key point then explaining each sub-level of back- up.
    3. Both A&B
    4. None
  1. Having formulated the groups, you need to identify an appropriate ordering for presentation in the report. This could be based on:
    1. Ranking – either descending or ascending in terms of importance
    2. Spatial – order the groups as you would visualise them being created into a diagram of chart
    3. Chronological – order the groups in order of time in which they occur – e.g. steps in a process
    4. Impact Your report should have an impact on the reader. culminating in the conclusion or recommendation
    5. On one of the above
  1. You could use either the top-down or bottom-up approach to ordering your report.
    1. True
    2. False
  1. Top-down ordering –
    1. Present your conclusions first
    2. Present the reasons for the conclusion
    3. Include the facts underlying your reasoning
    4. All of the above

  1. Bottom-up ordering –
    1. State the material facts
    2. Demonstrate the reasons for the facts then summarise them
    3. Include a conclusion based on the facts you have just summarized
    4. All of the above
  1. In practice the method preferred by managers and clients is by far the _________ approach.
    1. Top-down
    2. Bottom-down
    3. Both A&B
    4. None
  1. The main key issues relating to business reports to address include:
      1. Relevance – Only include information that is important to the reader
      2. Impact – Your report should have an impact on the reader
      3. Cost effectiveness – Reports are not judged by length but rather by effectiveness.
      4. Clarity – Follow the usual rules of effective clear business writing
      5. Timeliness – The report must be available to the reader when they need it.
    1. All of the above
    2. (I) and (IV) only
    3. (III) and (IV) only
    4. None
  1. The “Best approach” to write the first draft of the report would be:
    1. Write the easiest sections first to give yourself confidence.
    2. Write the most difficult sections first to relieve pressure.
    3. Write the sections in the order they appear in the report.
    4. Any of the above
  1. The title page is there to attract the reader to the report and assist them in finding the report at a later date. You would typically include:
      1. Title (and any sub-titles) – this should distinguish the report and ensure it is easily identifiable from others
      2. Author (internal reports only)
      3. Your organisation’s name (external reports only)
      4. Any reference numbers
      5. Degree of confidentiality
      6. Date
    1. All of the above
    2. (I) only
    3. (I) and (II) only
    4. None
  1. A table of contents is a list of all the sections that are included in the report (in the same order in which they appear) plus relevant page numbers.
    1. False
    2. True
  1. The benefit of including an executive summary is that for senior people with little time it is the one section they will read. Therefore, a succinct, clear and well written executive summary should always reach the reader.

The executive summary should include:

    1. What the report is about
    2. What the problems are
    3. The conclusions you arrived at
    4. What you recommend
    5. All of the above

  1. The conclusions and recommendations must follow logically from the rest of the report. When writing the conclusions and recommendations section, consider:
    1. Do the conclusions and recommendations follow logically from the rest of the report?
    2. Check the conclusions and recommendations against the original objective of the report.
    3. Make sure you have answered the reader’s key question.
    4. Finish with the final impression you want to make.
    5. All of the above
  1. The “appendices” should include detailed information that the reader can essentially do without in order to make sense of the main body of the report. Appendices should be:
    1. Included only if absolutely necessary.
    2. Non-essential for understanding the main arguments.
    3. Referred to somewhere in the body of the text i.e. there must be a link.
    4. Mentioned as the final item in the table of contents.
    5. All of the above
  1. Request for proposal (RFP) – An RFP is a formal document that describes a project, or need for service, and invites prospective bidders to propose solutions.
    1. The above statement is correct
    2. The above statement is incorrect
  1. A Request for proposal (RFP) should contain:
      1. Description of the work to be performed (in sufficient detail).
      2. Method of formal submission of the proposal e.g. in a prescribed form to be delivered by hand or by registered post.
      3. Milestones and deadlines of the proposal process.
      4. Terms relating to payments, such as advances, stage (interim) payments and any other special terms and conditions.
    1. All of the above
    2. (I) and (III) only
    3. (II) and (Iv) only
    4. None
  1. A proposal is either written in response to a Request for proposal (RFP), or alternatively used as to promote an idea to a relevant stakeholder.

 The essential qualities and contents of a well-prepared proposal include:

      1. purpose of the proposal is stated clearly
      2. problem or need for the proposal is understood and defined clearly
      3. suggested solution offered in the proposal is workable and in the best interests of the recipient
      4. proposal is honest, factual and objective
      5. benefits to be derived from the proposal outweigh the costs
      6. proposal contains a time schedule including the milestones and any checklists of the projects
      7. contains a list of the costs and resources involved in completion of the project.
    1. (I) (III) and (VI) only
    2. (I) (III) (IV) and (VI) only
    3. All of the above
    4. None
  1. Project progress report –
    1. Outlines the progress of the tasks in a project, including work completed, work remaining, costs incurred, remaining cost to complete the project and schedule of original and anticipated time for completion of the project.
    2. Documents the quality of an employee’s work performance for a particular period with identification of the individual’s strengths and weaknesses, training and development needs and career planning.
    3. A feasibility report examines the viability of the proposed undertaking from its technical, commercial and economic standpoints.
    4. Report that provides data of actual sales of various products classified by their quantities, territories, sales teams and distributors for a specific period.
  1. Performance appraisal report –
    1. Outlines the progress of the tasks in a project, including work completed, work remaining, costs incurred, remaining cost to complete the project and schedule of original and anticipated time for completion of the project.
    2. Documents the quality of an employee’s work performance for a particular period with identification of the individual’s strengths and weaknesses, training and development needs and career planning.
    3. A feasibility report examines the viability of the proposed undertaking from its technical, commercial and economic standpoints.
    4. Report that provides data of actual sales of various products classified by their quantities, territories, sales teams and distributors for a specific period.

  1. Feasibility report –
    1. Outlines the progress of the tasks in a project, including work completed, work remaining, costs incurred, remaining cost to complete the project and schedule of original and anticipated time for completion of the project.
    2. Documents the quality of an employee’s work performance for a particular period with identification of the individual’s strengths and weaknesses, training and development needs and career planning.
    3. A feasibility report examines the viability of the proposed undertaking from its technical, commercial and economic standpoints.
    4. Report that provides data of actual sales of various products classified by their quantities, territories, sales teams and distributors for a specific period.
  1. Sales and marketing report –
    1. Outlines the progress of the tasks in a project, including work completed, work remaining, costs incurred, remaining cost to complete the project and schedule of original and anticipated time for completion of the project.
    2. Documents the quality of an employee’s work performance for a particular period with identification of the individual’s strengths and weaknesses, training and development needs and career planning.
    3. A feasibility report examines the viability of the proposed undertaking from its technical, commercial and economic standpoints.
    4. Report that provides data of actual sales of various products classified by their quantities, territories, sales teams and distributors for a specific period.
  1. Operating report –
    1. Summarises the operational activity for a particular time period.
    2. Might include information on sales and purchases, employee information and inventory.
    3. Both A&B
    4. None

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