Employee Motivation MCQs Motivation in the workplace

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At the organizational (strategic) level, payment systems have the goals to Aid recruitment, Retain employees, Reward employees for performance.
Employee Motivation MCQs Motivation in the workplace

Employee Motivation MCQs

At the organizational (strategic) level, payment systems have the goals to Aid recruitment, Retain employees, Reward employees for performance. Here on MCQs.club we have prepared easy and helpful Multiple-Choice Questions (MCQs) on employee motivation and motivation in the workplace that covers the ways to motivate employees and staff these includes the rewards both financial and non-financial rewards for employees to motivate. The benefits of motivated employees result in job satisfaction, increase productivity and employee performance. Different types of employee motivation in HRM are practiced like intrinsic (monetary) and extrinsic (non-monetary) motivation. These MCQs are beneficial for Professional Accountancy exams, Competitive exams and Business management exams.

  1. At the organizational (strategic) level, payment systems have the following goals:
    1. Aid recruitment
    2. Retain employees
    3. Reward employees for performance
    4. All of the above
  1. At the managerial level, payment systems are used to:
    1. Attract and retain staff of a suitable quality
    2. Reward and motivate employees fairly and consistently
    3. Further the organisation’s objectives by providing competitive rewards
    4. Encourage performance and progression through development
    5. Recognise non-performance factors such as skill and competence
    6. Ensure salary costs are controlled
      1. All of the above
      2. (II) (III) and (V) only
      3. (II) and (V) only
      4. None
  1. Common types of pay structure include:
    1. Graded, Broad-banded structures, Individual
    2. Job family structures, Pay or profession/maturity curves, Spot rates
    3. Rate for age, pay spines, Manual worker pay structures, Integrated structures
    4. All of the above
  1. Job family structures –:
    1. Jobs in specific functions such as accounts or HR are grouped into families. The jobs differ in terms of skill levels or responsibility (such as accounts technician and management accountant) and pay is determined accordingly.
    2. are often used by government organisations where it is important for pay to be relative across a range of roles. They are a series of incremental points from the lowest to the highest paid jobs. Pay scales for specific jobs are superimposed onto the spine to ensure pay is relative.
    3. recognise the difference in status between those who work in manual roles against those in other parts of the organisation. Real differentials are incorporated that reflect differences in skill and responsibility but otherwise they are similar to other pay structures.
    4. incorporate one grading system for all employees except senior management. They are often used where employees were paid historically under separate agreements.
  1. Pay spines –:
    1. Jobs in specific functions such as accounts or HR are grouped into families. The jobs differ in terms of skill levels or responsibility (such as accounts technician and management accountant) and pay is determined accordingly.
    2. are often used by government organisations where it is important for pay to be relative across a range of roles. They are a series of incremental points from the lowest to the highest paid jobs. Pay scales for specific jobs are superimposed onto the spine to ensure pay is relative.
    3. recognise the difference in status between those who work in manual roles against those in other parts of the organisation. Real differentials are incorporated that reflect differences in skill and responsibility but otherwise they are similar to other pay structures.
    4. incorporate one grading system for all employees except senior management. They are often used where employees were paid historically under separate agreements.
  1. Manual worker pay structures –:
    1. Jobs in specific functions such as accounts or HR are grouped into families. The jobs differ in terms of skill levels or responsibility (such as accounts technician and management accountant) and pay is determined accordingly.
    2. are often used by government organisations where it is important for pay to be relative across a range of roles. They are a series of incremental points from the lowest to the highest paid jobs. Pay scales for specific jobs are superimposed onto the spine to ensure pay is relative.
    3. recognise the difference in status between those who work in manual roles against those in other parts of the organisation. Real differentials are incorporated that reflect differences in skill and responsibility but otherwise they are similar to other pay structures.
    4. incorporate one grading system for all employees except senior management. They are often used where employees were paid historically under separate agreements.
  1. Integrated structures –:
    1. Jobs in specific functions such as accounts or HR are grouped into families. The jobs differ in terms of skill levels or responsibility (such as accounts technician and management accountant) and pay is determined accordingly.
    2. are often used by government organisations where it is important for pay to be relative across a range of roles. They are a series of incremental points from the lowest to the highest paid jobs. Pay scales for specific jobs are superimposed onto the spine to ensure pay is relative.
    3. recognise the difference in status between those who work in manual roles against those in other parts of the organisation. Real differentials are incorporated that reflect differences in skill and responsibility but otherwise they are similar to other pay structures.
    4. incorporate one grading system for all employees except senior management. They are often used where employees were paid historically under separate agreements.

  1. Points-factor evaluation scheme is a method for determining pay rates. Identify the steps involved:
    1. Evaluate the roles and calculate evaluation job scores based on the level or category of employee.
    2. Plot job scores on a scatter diagram and draw a line of ‘best fit’.
    3. Plot the upper, median and lower market pay rates from the available information.
    4. Plot a desired pay policy line based on the market data.
    5. Decide on the overall shape of the pay structure based on the pay policy.
    6. Define pay ranges for each level taking into account flexibility for pay-progression.
      1. All of the above
      2. (I) (II) (III) and (IV) only
      3. (II) (III) and (IV) only
      4. None
  1. Ranking/market method is a method for determining pay rates. Identify the steps involved:
    1. Rank the existing jobs and plot actual pay rates to show current pay policy.
    2. Plot market data and derive a ‘best fit’ policy.
    3. Decide on a pay range policy and plot upper and lower pay rates using the ‘best fit’ policy as the mid-range.
    4. Develop a grade structure and pay rates for each grade.
    5. All of the above
  1. The main types of incentive scheme are:
    1. Performance related pay (PRP)
    2. Bonus schemes
    3. Profit-sharing
    4. All of the above
  1. Performance related pay –:
    1. The most common individual PRP scheme for wage earners is straight piecework: payment of a fixed amount per unit produced, or operation completed.
    2. are supplementary to basic salary, and have been found to be popular with entrepreneurial types, usually in marketing and sales. Bonuses are both incentives and rewards.
    3. offer employees (or selected groups of them) bonuses, perhaps in the form of shares in the company, related directly to profits. The formula for determining the amounts may vary, but in recent years a straightforward distribution of a percentage of profits above a given target has given way to a value-added related concept.
    4. None
  1. Bonus schemes –:
    1. The most common individual PRP scheme for wage earners is straight piecework: payment of a fixed amount per unit produced, or operation completed.
    2. are supplementary to basic salary, and have been found to be popular with entrepreneurial types, usually in marketing and sales. Bonuses are both incentives and rewards.
    3. offer employees (or selected groups of them) bonuses, perhaps in the form of shares in the company, related directly to profits. The formula for determining the amounts may vary, but in recent years a straightforward distribution of a percentage of profits above a given target has given way to a value-added related concept.
    4. None
  1. Profit sharing schemes and employee shareholders –:
    1. The most common individual PRP scheme for wage earners is straight piecework: payment of a fixed amount per unit produced, or operation completed.
    2. are supplementary to basic salary, and have been found to be popular with entrepreneurial types, usually in marketing and sales. Bonuses are both incentives and rewards.
    3. offer employees (or selected groups of them) bonuses, perhaps in the form of shares in the company, related directly to profits. The formula for determining the amounts may vary, but in recent years a straightforward distribution of a percentage of profits above a given target has given way to a value-added related concept.
    4. None
  1. Incentive schemes have potential difficulties. Identify those:
    1. Increased earnings simply may not be an incentive to some individuals. An individual who already enjoys a good income may be more concerned with increasing their leisure time.
    2. Workers are unlikely to be in complete control of results. External factors, such as the general economic climate, interest rates and exchange rates may play a part in profitability in particular. In these cases, the relationship between an individual’s efforts and their reward may be indistinct.
    3. It is often all too easy to manipulate the rules of the incentive scheme, especially where there are allowances for waiting time, when production is held up by factors beyond the control of the people concerned.
    4. All of the above

  1. Which of the following is correct regrading ‘Total reward schemes’?
    1. Total reward schemes (or package) is a bundle of cash and non-cash motivators offered to staff.
    2. Total reward schemes recognise that individuals are all different and may not all be motivated by money.
    3. Both A&B
    4. None
  1. Advantages of total reward schemes include:
    1. Attracts potential employees
    2. Improves employee motivation
    3. Both A&B
    4. None
  1. Disadvantages of total reward schemes include:
    1. It might have no effect
    2. It might cause organisational stagnation as employees may not push themselves for further reward
    3. It ignores employee welfare
    4. Employees may prefer to have cash only
    5. All of the above
  1. Methods that can be used to improve the motivation of employees by introducing changes to their work include:
    1. Job redesign,
    2. Rotation,
    3. Enlargement and enrichment
    4. All of the above
  1. Which of the following is correct regarding Job redesign?
    1. Job redesign aims to improve performance through increasing the understanding and motivation of employees.
    2. Job redesign aims to ensure that an individual’s job suits them in terms of what motivates them and their need for personal growth and development.
    3. Both A&B
    4. None 

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