Human Resource Practices MCQs | Human resource development

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Human resource development (HRD) is the process of extending personal abilities and qualities by means of education, training and other learning
Human Resource Practices MCQs human resource development

Human Resource Practices MCQs

Human resource development (HRD) is the process of extending personal abilities and qualities by means of education, training and other learning experiences. Here on MCQs.club we have prepared simple Multiple-Choice Questions (MCQs) that covers the human resource practices, training, capital development, HR process and management appraisal with examples. These MCQs also addresses the HR best practices, functions, policies and tools both at micro and macro levels. Our prepared MCQs are beneficial for Accountancy exams, Business management exams and Competitive exams.

  1. Recruitment – is concerned with finding applicants: going out into the labour market, communicating opportunities and information and generating interest.
    1. True
    2. False
  1. Selection – consists of procedures to choose the successful candidate from among those made available by the recruitment effort.
    1. False
    2. True
  1. A systematic approach to recruitment and selection should be followed.
    1. Detailed personnel planning.
    2. Job analysis
    3. Identification of vacancies, by way of the personnel plan (if vacancies are created by demand for new labour) or requisitions for replacement staff by a department which has ‘lost’ a current job-holder.
    4. Evaluation of the sources of labour, again by way of the personnel plan, which should outline personnel supply and availability, at macro- and micro-levels. Internal and external sources, and media for reaching both, will be considered.
    5. Review of applications, assessing the relative merits of broadly suitable candidates.
    6. Notifying applicants of the results of the selection process.
    7. Preparing employment contracts, induction, training programmes and so on.
      1. (I) and (II) only
      2. (II) (V) and (VII) only
      3. All of the above
      4. None
  1. The recruitment process begins by determining the nature of the vacancies and ends with the short-listing of candidates for selection.
    1. True
    2. False
  1. Job analysis – ‘the process of collecting, analysing and setting out information about the content of jobs in order to provide the basis for a job description and data for recruitment, training, job evaluation and performance management. Job analysis concentrates on what job holders are expected to do.’
    1. The above statement is incorrect
    2. The above statement is incorrect
  1. The management of the organisation needs to analyse the sort of work needed to be done in order to recruit effectively. Identify the type of information needed:
    1. Purpose of the job, Content of the job, Accountabilities
    2. Performance criteria, Responsibility
    3. Organisational factors, Developmental factors, Environmental factors
    4. All of the above
  1. A person’s COMPETENCE is ‘a capacity that leads to behaviour that meets the job demands within the parameters of the organisational environment and that, in turn, brings about desired results’. What are the types of competencies?
    1. Behavioural/personal – are underlying personal characteristics and behaviour required for successful performance.
    2. Work-based/occupational – are ‘expectations of workplace performance and the outputs and standards people in specific roles are expected to obtain’.
    3. Generic competences
    4. All of the above

  1. What are the parameters of job design, as established by Mintzberg, include?
    1. Job specialization
    2. Regulation of behavior
    3. Training in skills and indoctrination in organisational values.
    4. All of the above
  1. The main purposes of a job description include:
    1. Organisational – Defines the job’s place in the organisational structure
    2. Recruitment – Provides information for identifying the sort of person needed (person specification)
    3. Legal – Provides the basis for a contract of employment Performance
    4. Performance – objectives can be set around the job description
    5. All of the above
  1. Selection involves a filtering process, by reviewing application forms, interviewing and testing. A variety of techniques may be used in selection, those chosen in a particular circumstance must be:
    1. Reliable – generate consistent results
    2. Valid – accurately predict performance of employees
    3. Fair – non-discriminating
    4. Cost-effective – the benefits of obtaining good quality staff must justify the costs of selecting them
    5. All of the above
  1. An ineffective selection process may result in the:
    1. Employment of unsuitable applicants
    2. Rejection of suitable applicants
    3. Either A or B
    4. None
  1. Aims of the interview include:
    1. Finding the best person for the job, through direct assessment
    2. Giving the applicant the chance to learn about the business
    3. Both A&B
    4. None
  1. In preparation for the interview, the interviewer should study:
    1. The job description (and specification if separate), to review the major demands of the job.
    2. The personnel specification, to make an assessment of the applicant’s character and qualifications.
    3. The application form, to decide on questions or question areas for each applicant.
    4. All of the above
  1. Tests are used to supplement interviews or select applicants for interview. What types of test may be used?
    1. Psychological tests and personality tests
    2. Cognitive tests – relate to thinking processes. These include intelligence tests which measure the applicant’s general intellectual ability (eg IQ tests), and aptitude tests.
    3. Psychometric tests –are selection tests that seek to quantify psychological dimensions of job applicants.
    4. All of the above

  1. Advantages of tests include:
    1. A test can be a sensitive measuring instrument.
    2. Tests are standardised, so that all candidates are assessed by the same yardstick.
    3. Tests always measure the same thing (eg IQ).
    4. All of the above
  1. Disadvantages of tests include:
    1. They may over-simplify complex issues.
    2. They are culturally-specific. The cultures in other countries may differ.
    3. Results should only be used to support other selection methods.
    4. All of the above
  1. Practical steps that can be taken in the employee recruitment process include:
    1. Advertising, Recruitment agencies,
    2. Application forms, Interviews
    3. Selection tests, Records
    4. Combination of the above
  1. Acceptable reasons for dismissal may include:
    1. Conduct – Unacceptable conduct continuing after warnings/counselling
    2. Capability – The employee is not capable of the role (after appropriate guidance, training etc)
    3. Breach of statutory duty – If continuing the employment relationship would mean the employer breaching a statutory duty
    4. Dishonesty, Loss of trust Redundancy, Cessation of business, Relocation of business and Cessation of work employed for.
    5. All of the above
  1. Identify the possible reasons for unfair dismissal.
    1. Dismissal on grounds of race, gender or disability discrimination
    2. Pregnancy or other maternity-related grounds
    3. Due to a request for flexible working practices
    4. Trade union membership or activities
    5. Taking steps to avert danger to health and safety at work
    6. Seeking to enforce rights relating to the national minimum wage
    7. Refusing or opting out of Sunday working (in the retail sector)
      1. All of the above
      2. (I) (II) (VII) only
      3. (III) and (VI) only
      4. None
  1. Alternatives to enforced redundancies could include:
    1. Reduced overtime, Recruitment limits (or a ‘freeze’)
    2. Enforced retirement (of those over retirement age), Voluntary early retirement (of those close to retirement age)
    3. Shorter hours, Job shares (eg two employees working shorter hours), Voluntary redundancy
    4. All of the above
  1. Human resource development (HRD) – is the process of extending personal abilities and qualities by means of education, training and other learning experiences.
    1. The above is correct
    2. The above is incorrect

  1. The overall purpose of employee and management development includes:
    1. Ensuring the organisation meets current and future performance objectives by…
    2. Continuous improvement of the performance of individuals and teams, and by…
    3. Maximising people’s potential for growth (and promotion).
    4. All of the above
  1. Organisations often have a training and development strategy, based on the overall strategy for the business. What are the steps involved?
    1. Identify the skills and competences are needed by the business plan.
    2. Draw up the development strategy to show how training and development activities will assist in meeting the targets of the corporate plan.
    3. Implement the training and development strategy.
    4. Combination of all of the above
  1. The benefits for the organisation of training and development programmes include:
    1. Minimise the learning costs of obtaining the skills the organisation needs
    2. Lower costs and increased productivity
    3. Fewer accidents, and better health and safety
    4. Less need for detailed supervision
    5. Training ensures that people have the variety of skills needed
    6. Training helps organisations manage change by letting people know why the change is happening and giving them the skills to cope with it
    7. Training programmes can increase commitment to the organisation’s goals.
      1. All of the above
      2. (I) (III) and (V) only
      3. (II) and (V) only
      4. None
  1. The benefits for the employee of training and development include:
    1. Enhances portfolio of skills
    2. Psychological benefits
    3. Job satisfaction and Social benefit
    4. All of the above
  1. Training is not always the answer to performance related problems. Identify why so.
    1. It is irrelevant to problems caused by faulty organisation, layout, methods, equipment, employee selection and placement and so on.
    2. Cost, time, inconvenience, apathy and unrealistic expectations of training in the past may restrict its effectiveness.
    3. Limitations imposed by intelligence, poor motivation and the psychological restrictions of the learning process also restrict its effectiveness.
    4. All of the above
  1. Disadvantages of formal training include:
    1. An individual will not benefit from formal training unless they want to learn. The individual’s superior may need to provide encouragement in this respect.
    2. If the subject matter of the training course does not relate to an individual’s job, the learning will quickly be forgotten.
    3. Individuals may not be able to carry over what they have learnt to their own particular job.
    4. All of the above
  1. Validation of training –:
    1. means comparing the actual costs of the scheme against the assessed benefits which are being obtained. If the costs exceed the benefits, the scheme will need to be redesigned or withdrawn.
    2. means observing the results of the course and measuring whether the training objectives have been achieved.
    3. Both A&B
    4. None

  1. Evaluation of training –:
    1. means comparing the actual costs of the scheme against the assessed benefits which are being obtained. If the costs exceed the benefits, the scheme will need to be redesigned or withdrawn.
    2. means observing the results of the course and measuring whether the training objectives have been achieved.
    3. Both A&B
    4. None
  1. Identify the levels at which training can be evaluated.
    1. Reaction – how the trainees act, enjoyment level
    2. Learning – has the knowledge been absorbed?
    3. Behaviour – have required behavioural changes taken place?
    4. Results – what benefits have resulted from the training (eg better quality, reduced costs)?
    5. All of the above
  1. Which of the following statement is correct regarding ‘career management’?
    1. Career management is a technique whereby the progress of individuals within an organisation from job to job is planned with organisational needs and individual capacity in mind.
    2. It ensures that the organisation has a reserve of managers-in-waiting. In flat or delayered organisations this is particularly important, as the jump in responsibility from junior to senior positions is much wider than in organisations with extensive hierarchies.
    3. It ensures people get the right training to enable them to develop the right abilities for the job.
    4. All of the above are correct
  1. Career development is based on an individual’s education, training and development and is an important factor in any appraisal system.
    1. True
    2. False
  1. Which of the following statement is correct with regard to ‘Management development’?
    1. Management development includes general education, specific learning and wider experience. It is essential if managers are to make the leap from functional to general management.
    2. Management development is the process of improving the effectiveness of an individual manager by developing the necessary skills and understanding of organisational goals.
    3. Both A&B
    4. None
  1. Appraisal is the systematic review and assessment of an employee’s:
    1. Performance
    2. Potential
    3. Training needs
    4. All of the above
  1. The benefits of appraisal for the employer include:
    1. Feedback and objective setting – the appraisal is an opportunity of the employer to give feedback and to set the employee’s objectives for the following period.
    2. Promotion – it provides a formal system for assessing the performance and potential of employees, with a view to identifying candidates for promotion.
    3. Training – it provides a system for identifying training needs, in order to raise the level of efficiency and effective less.
    4. Improved communication – if well managed communication and hence working relations can be improved between managers and staff.
    5. All of the above

  1. The benefits of appraisal for the employee include:
    1. Feedback and objective setting – the appraisal is an opportunity for the employee to receive feed and set objectives for the following period.
    2. Future prospects – a formal appraisal system offers employees an opportunity to discuss further prospects and ambitions
    3. Training – appraisals can be used to identify and agree further training, to improve employee competence
    4. Pay and rewards – the appraisal can be used as a basis for considering pay and rewards.
    5. All of the above
  1. The appraisal interview is the point at which the employee and manager meet formally to discuss performance and agree targets for the forthcoming period. From the following identify the documents that should have been read and copied for the interview:
    1. The job description
    2. A statement of performance such as the rating sheet or the appraisal form
    3. A diary or record book which highlights the good and bad points of the employee’s performance over the review period.
    4. Peer assessment
    5. Comments from clients
    6. The employee’s self-assessment form
      1. All of the above
      2. (II) (III) and (V) only
      3. (II) and (III) only
      4. None
  1. Conducting the interview – The first steps are to put the employee at ease, explain the purpose of the interview and then discuss the employee’s progress. Identify the ‘must do’ skills while conducting the interview:
    1. Ask open questions requiring more than a yes or no answer
    2. Ask closed questions only when clarification is needed
    3. Allow time for the appraise to ask question
    4. Refrain from asking multiple or confusing questions
    5. Encourage conversation with body language and appropriate cues
    6. Refrain from talking too much
    7. Be tolerant of pauses and silences
    8. Listen carefully, making sure that the interviewee knows you are listening
      1. All of the above
      2. (I) (IV) and (VIII) only
      3. (IV) and (VIII) only
      4. None
  1. Appraisal has a clear link to career development. Identify the concepts that the career development sees the interaction of:
    1. Education – a process results in a formal qualification
    2. Training
    3. Development
    4. All of the above
  1. Which of the following statement is correct regarding ‘appraisal’?
    1. Employee appraisal can be viewed as a control tool as it aims to influence employee behaviour and maximise utilisation of the organisation’s human resource.
    2. The process of appraisal is designed to review performance over the past period and improve it in the future.
    3. Both A&B
    4. None
  1. The general purpose of any appraisal system is to improve efficiency. Personnel appraisal aims to ensure individuals are performing to the best of their ability, are developing their potential and that the organisation is best utilising their abilities.
    1. The above statement is true
    2. The above statement is false
  1. Appraisals may include:
    1. Reward review. Measuring the extent to which an employee is deserving of a bonus or pay increase as compared with their peers.
    2. Performance review, for planning and following-up training and development programmes, ie identifying training needs, validating training methods and so on.
    3. Potential review, as an aid to planning career development and succession, by attempting to predict the level and type of work the individual will be capable of in the future.
    4. All of the above

  1. The objectives of appraisals include:
    1. Establishing the key deliverables an individual has to produce to enable the organisation to achieve its objectives.
    2. Comparing the individual’s level of performance against a standard, as a means of quality control.
    3. Identifying the individual’s training and development needs in the light of actual performance.
    4. Identifying areas that require improvement.
    5. Monitoring the organisation’s initial selection procedures against subsequent performance.
    6. Improving communication between different levels in the hierarchy.
      1. All of the above
      2. (I) (III) and (V) only
      3. (I) and (V) only
      4. None
  1. Effective appraisals can be difficult to implement. Identify the particular problems.
    1. The formulation of desired traits and standards against which individuals can be consistently and objectively assessed.
    2. Recording assessments. Managers should be encouraged to utilise a standard and understood framework, but still be allowed to express what they consider to be important, and without too much form-filling.
    3. Getting the appraiser and appraisee together, so that both contribute to the assessment and plans for improvement and/or development.
    4. All of the above
  1. Upward appraisal – whereby employees are not rated by their superiors but by their subordinates. The followers appraise the leader.
    1. True
    2. False
  1. Advantages of upward appraisal include:
    1. Subordinates tend to know their superior better than superiors know their subordinates.
    2. As all subordinates rate their managers statistically, these ratings tend to be more reliable – the more subordinates the better. Instead of the biases of individual managers’ ratings, the various ratings of the employees can be converted into a representative view.
    3. Subordinates’ ratings have more impact because it is unusual to receive ratings from them.
    4. All of the above
  1. Which of the following is correct regarding 180-degree appraisal?
    1. It involves the manager obtaining feedback from the appraisee’s colleagues and peers. It may be used as an alternative to, or in addition to, feedback received from the appraisee’s supervisor. The feedback may be named or anonymous.
    2. The use of 180-degree appraisal gives a wider picture than simply relying on the individial’s supervisor.
    3. It may prevent the supervisor from providing unfair feedback on the appraisee, because they know the manager will also obtain feedback from others.
    4. All of the above
  1. 360-degree appraisal involves taking downwards, upwards and customer appraisals together – so it involves the collection of feedback on an individual’s performance from a range of sources.
    1. True
    2. False
  1. Sources of 360-degree appraisal may include:
    1. The person’s immediate manager.
    2. Peers and co-workers – Most people interact with others within an organisation, either as members of a team or as the receivers or providers of services. They can offer useful feedback.
    3. Customers – If sales people know what customers thought of them, they might be able to improve their technique.
    4. All of the above

  1. What are the types of approach to appraisal interviews?
    1. The tell and sell method – the manager tells the subordinate how they have been assessed, and then tries to sell (gain acceptance of) the evaluation and the improvement plan.
    2. The tell and listen method – the manager tells the subordinate how they have been assessed, and then invites the subordinate to respond.
    3. The problem-solving approach – the manager abandons the role of critic altogether, and becomes a counsellor and helper.
    4. All of the above
  1. After the appraisal interview, the manager may complete the report, with an overall assessment of potential and/or the jointly-reached conclusion of the interview, with recommendations for follow-up action.
    1. The above statement is true
    2. The above statement is false
  1. Follow-up procedures typically include:
    1. Informing the employee of the results of the appraisal, if this has not been central to the review interview.
    2. Carrying out agreed actions on training, promotion and so on.
    3. Monitoring the appraisee’s progress and checking that they have carried out agreed actions or improvements.
    4. Taking necessary steps to help the appraisee to attain improvement objectives, by guidance, providing feedback, upgrading equipment, altering work methods and so on.
    5. All of the above

—More to come soon—

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