System Development Lifecycle & Software Development Models – CISA

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The lifecycle process for business applications, commonly referred to as a systems development lifecycle (SDLC).
System Development Lifecycle & Software Development Models MCQs

Software development life cycle models and System development life cycle models MCQs

The lifecycle process for business applications, commonly referred to as a systems development lifecycle (SDLC). Here on MCQs.club we have prepared Multiple-Choice Questions (MCQs) on system development lifecycle & software development models that fully cover MCQs on SDLC life cycle models, waterfall system development life cycle, software/system development life cycle types, system development life cycle advantages and disadvantages, spiral system development life cycle. These MCQs on types of SDLC life cycle are useful for Professional Accountancy exams, Business management exams and Competitive exams.

  1. The lifecycle process for business applications, commonly referred to as a systems development lifecycle (SDLC), begins when an individual application is initiated as a result of:
    1. A new opportunity that relates to a new or existing business process
    2. A problem that relates to an existing business process
    3. A problem with the current technology
    4. All of the above
  1. Application systems are developed and maintained to serve system users by providing them with various data processing and information reporting capabilities. The phases of application systems include:
    1. Systems planning, System analysis
    2. Systems design, System development
    3. Systems implementation, Systems operation and maintenance
    4. All of the above
  1. The systems development lifecycle (SDLC) is also known as the traditional waterfall development approach, and the main characteristic of this approach is that systems planning, analysis, design, development and implementation are done in sequence.
    1. The above is correct
    2. The above is incorrect
  1. Steps include in Systems planning (feasibility) phase are:
      1. Define a time frame for which the solution is required
      2. Determine an optimum alternative/solution
      3. Determine if an existing system can correct the situation with slight or no modifications
      4. Determine if a vendor product offers a solution to the problem
      5. Determine the approximate cost to develop the system
      6. Determine if the solution fits the business strategy
    1. (I) (II) and (V) only
    2. (II) (IV) and (VI) only
    3. All of the above
    4. None
  1. Feasibility studies (Systems planning) calculate the probability of success of the proposed solution and include:
    1. Technology
    2. Economic
    3. Organizational factors
    4. Legal, ethical and other constraints
    5. All of the above
  1. Steps include in Systems design phase include:
      1. Identifying the purpose and major functions of the system and sub-systems
      2. Determining system inputs and outputs to and from the system
      3. Evaluating the necessary processing functions, both manual and automated
      4. Developing system justification and processing alternatives
      5. Defining control, security and audit requirements
    1. All of the above
    2. (I) (II) and (V) only
    3. (II) (III) and (IV) only
    4. None
  1. Key Systems design phase activities include:
    1. Developing system flowcharts to illustrate how information will flow through the system
    2. Describing inputs and outputs, such as screen designs and reports
    3. Determining data file or database system file design
    4. All of the above

  1. Data flow diagram –
    1. It graphically represents the flow of data through an information system and models its process aspects.
    2. They are a preliminary step used to create an overview of the system which can later be elaborated.
    3. They can also be used for the visualization of data processing
    4. All of the above
  1. Pseudo code – is an informal high-level description of the operating principle of a computer program or other algorithm.
    1. True
    2. False
  1. The key activities performed in a system development phase include:
    1. Coding and developing program and system-level documents
    2. Debugging and testing programs developed
    3. Creating user procedures to handle transition to the new system
    4. All of the above
  1. Programming languages commonly used for developing application programs are:
    1. COBOL (Common Business Oriented Language), PL 1 (Programming Language 1) and FORTRAN (Formula Translation Language)
    2. Object-oriented languages for business purpose, such as JAVA
    3. Decision support or expert systems languages (Express LISP and PROLOG)
    4. All of the above
  1. The basic elements of an application software testing activities include:
    1. The Test plan
    2. Bottom up
    3. Top down
    4. All of the above
  1. Most application software testing of large systems follows a “Bottom-up” testing approach that involves several levels of testing.
    1. True
    2. False
  1. Software goes through two stages of testing before it is considered finished. The stages are:
    1. Alpha testing
    2. Beta testing
    3. Both A&B
    4. None

  1. The objectives of the systems Implementation phase is to develop user reference and training manuals and to train users and IS staff in the use and operation of the system, to conduct user acceptance testing of the system and to convert data files.
    1. The above is correct
    2. The above is incorrect
  1. Direct Conversion – with this method of implementation the users stop using the old system and start using the new system from a given date.
    1. True
    2. False
  1. Advantages of using Direct Conversion method include:
    1. It can be achieved very quickly, thus reducing the downtime of the system.
    2. It is the easiest method when compatible hardware and software exists in both systems
    3. Both A&B
    4. None
  1. Disadvantages of using Direct Conversion method include:
    1. It requires the data in the old system to be converted for use with the new system.
    2. It is a problem-laced method if information technology is being introduced for the first time.
    3. If the new system fails or problems arise, the old system is not available as a backup
    4. All of the above
  1. Software requirement specification (SRS) – describes all data, functional and behavioral requirements of the software under production or development.
    1. True
    2. False
  1. A Software requirement specification (SRS) document may include:
    1. The Introduction, Document conventions, Overall description
    2. Usage cases, Data model and description, Functional requirements
    3. Non-functional requirements, Interface requirements, Behavioral model and description
    4. All of the above
  1. Software design specification – is a document of a software artifact, intended to accomplish goals, using a set of primitive components and subject to constraints.
    1. True
    2. False

  1. The objectives to the systems operation and maintenance phase is to run production jobs and to provide production support to conduct a post-implementation review of the system to ensure that all objectives have been met.
    1. The above is correct
    2. The above is incorrect
  1. The objectives of a post-implementation review include:
    1. To assess the adequacy of the system
    2. Evaluate the projected cost benefits or return on investment (ROI) measurements
    3. Develop recommendations that address the system’s inadequacies and deficiencies
    4. Assess the development project process
    5. All of the above
  1. For risks regarding inadequate management or the information systems development lifecycle, the suggested controls or control procedure include:
    1. Develop IS plans, conduct thorough analysis of user/system requirements to justify the system
    2. Perform cost-benefit analysis
    3. Initiate computer capacity management and planning studies
    4. All of the above
  1. For risks regarding User requirements and business objectives may not be met, the suggested controls or control procedure include:
    1. Involve functional users in developing and maintaining systems
    2. Develop prototyping models to define user and business requirements
    3. Both A&B
    4. None
  1. The deciding factors in acquiring and using purchased software packages. Compared to in-house development include:
    1. Lower cost to acquire and implement
    2. Less time to install the package
    3. Limited IS staff to develop and maintain systems in-house
    4. Lack of advance computer skills among the IS staff
    5. All of the above
  1. What can go wrong in vendor-developed software?
    1. It may not have adequate built-in usability, security, and maintainability features.
    2. Software packages may not have adequate transaction processing audit trails
    3. Purchased software may not have adequate internal program processing controls
    4. All of the above
  1. System maintenance practices –
    1. Refer primarily to the process of managing change to application systems while maintaining the integrity of both the production source and executable code.
    2. Refer to the process of modifying application programs, based on organizational needs, while maintaining the integrity of both the production source and executable code.
    3. Both A&B
    4. None

  1. System maintenance controls –
    1. Refer primarily to the process of managing change to application systems while maintaining the integrity of both the production source and executable code.
    2. Refer to the process of modifying application programs, based on organizational needs, while maintaining the integrity of both the production source and executable code.
    3. Both A&B
    4. None
  1. Change management process –
    1. The change management process begins with authorizing changes to occur
    2. Change requests are initiated from end users as well as operational staff and system development/maintenance staff.
    3. Both A&B
    4. None
  1. Software configuration management (SCM) is the overall management of a software design project as it evolves into a software product or system. This includes:
    1. Technical aspects of the project
    2. All level of communications, organization
    3. The control of modifications changes to the project plan by the programmers during the development phase.
    4. All of the above
  1. The primary purpose of library control software is to:
    1. Prohibit programmers from accessing production source and object libraries
    2. Prohibit batch program updating
    3. Allow read-only access to source code
    4. Require the programmer to turn over changed source code to the control group
    5. All of the above
  1. What Steps Auditors must consider in IT Change Management Process:
    1. Ignition, Categorization
    2. Release decision, Migration, Emergency changes
    3. Both A&B
    4. None
  1. Capability maturity model integration (CMMI) –
    1. Belongs to the model family developed by Software Engineering Institute (SEI)
    2. Is a descriptive model that details the essential attributes that should characterize an organization at a given maturity level
    3. Provide a framework to organize these evolutionary steps within five maturity levels
    4. All of the above
  1. What are maturity levels?
    1. A maturity level is an evolutionary, well-defined platform oriented to obtaining a mature software process.
    2. Each maturity level provides a layer to the foundation of a continuous improvement process
    3. Each maturity level has a set of goals that, once reached, stabilize an important component of the software process
    4. All of above

  1. Agile development approach –
    1. This method is based on iterative and incremental development
    2. It promotes adaptive planning, evolutionary development and delivery, a time-boxed iterative approach and encourages rapid and flexible response to change.
    3. Both A&B
    4. None
  1. The Waterfall Model –
    1. In the waterfall model systems development is broken down into a number of sequential stages.
    2. The stages in water fall model are interlinked as the output from one stage is input to the subsequent stage.
    3. The model has eight different stages
    4. All of the above
  1. Advantages of waterfall model include:
    1. It provides a clear and easy way to follow sequence of activities
    2. Issues of quality management are addressed through the verification and validation sections in each stage of the model
    3. Project management and control is facilitated by the need to complete each stage before moving on the next
    4. All of the above
  1. Disadvantages of waterfall model include:
    1. Systems development may not be linear
    2. Estimating times and costs are difficult for each stage
    3. Users are only involved at the start and end of the process
    4. All of the above
  1. The Spiral Model –
    1. The model is divided into four quadrants
    2. The quadrants of the model should be completed in sequence
    3. User requirements are not fully specified when systems development work begins.
    4. All of the above
  1. Advantages of Spiral model include:
    1. It is a closer reflection of the reality of systems development where it often necessary to visit and revisit areas of work until they are perfected
    2. Regular production of system prototypes encourages user feedback.
    3. Both A&B
    4. None
  1. Disadvantages of Spiral model include:
    1. There is a danger of slow progress
    2. There is a temptation to seek a perfect system though excessive iteration, rather than to accept a workable solution that can be delivered on time and to budget
    3. Both A&B
    4. None

  1. Prototyping – Prototypes are models of a proposed system. They vary greatly in complexity. The purposes of a prototype include:
    1. To capture unknown user requirements through feedback on the prototype
    2. To validate the analyst’s understanding of known user requirements
    3. Both A&B
    4. None
  1. What is the process of building a model that demonstrates the features of a proposed product, service or system?
    1. Prototyping
    2. Prototype
    3. Proof-of-concept prototype
    4. Selling prototype

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